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President Trump: I Will Stop United Nations from Forming ‘One World Government

President Donald Trump has promised to block the United Nations from forming a ‘One World Government.’

While addressing the UN recently, Trump urged other nations to reject the push for a single globalist government and instead embrace patriotism and sovereignty.

In an historic speech earlier this year, Trump highlighted the achievements of his presidency, slamming America’s adversaries and rallying against the elites end goal of a globalist dystopia.

“America is governed by Americans,” Trump said.

“We reject the ideology of globalism and we embrace the doctrine of patriotism.”

“Around the world, responsible nations must defend against threats to sovereignty not just from global governance, but also from other, new forms of coercion and domination.”

The UN Plans to be One World Government By 2030

In the 1960s, an informed but naïve undergraduate, I was walking across the campus of the University of Pennsylvania with the Chairman of the Chemistry Department, Prof. Charles C. Price.  He told me that he was president of the United World Federalists, and asked if I knew what that organization was.  When I said that I did not, he replied that they believed in a one-world government that would grow out of the United Nations.

I was nonplussed as I had never heard anyone suggest that idea before.  To me, the United Nations was a benevolent organization dedicated to pressuring the world community in the direction of peace, and to operating charitable programs to help the struggling, impoverished peoples of the world.   I imagined the UN as a kind of United Way on a worldwide scale.

How would Prof. Price’s vision of a new world government emerge?  Although there was a socialistic thread in its founding document, the United Nations was formed based on a vision of human rights presented in the “Universal Declaration of Human Rights” (UDHR) which placed the concept of rights at the forefront for the progress of the world body.  And rights are the mainstay for uplifting human freedom and the dignity of the individual.

The UDHR document followed many amazing documents that presented rights as the central concept of the post-feudal world:  the English Declaration (or Bill) of Rights of 1689, the U.S. Declaration of Independence with its important and forceful assertion of inalienable natural rights, the powerful U.S. Bill of Rights enacted in 1791, and the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen (1789).

The word “rights” appears in almost every sentence of the 1869-word UN document.  The document is literally obsessed with rights, and one must assume they are likewise obsessed with the rights successes as manifested in the United Kingdom, the U.S., and France.   However, there are some deviations from the rights usage we are all familiar with.

In Article 3, Instead of the inalienable rights of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” found in our Declaration of Independence, the UN declares everyone’s right to “life, liberty and security of person.”  Are they implying that security will bring happiness?  Or are they implying that happiness is too ephemeral a value, and too Western?  Perhaps more mundane survival goals are needed by most of the world.

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